Sporadicq

sporadic quotes and inspirations
Eleusinian Mysteries: Persephone, Triptolemos, and Demeter, on a marble bas-relief from Eleusis, 440–430 BC

Eleusinian Mysteries: Persephone, Triptolemos, and Demeter, on a marble bas-relief from Eleusis, 440–430 BC

Large cult statue of Artemis of Ephesus. Also called “The Great Artemis”, marble, 292 cm high, excavated in the Prytaneion (at the high ground in Ephesus).

Drawing of the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus.

Drawing of the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus.

The Cult Statue of Artemis of Ephesus

The Cult Statue of Artemis of Ephesus

Jupiter and Semele (1894-95), by Gustave Moreau

Jupiter and Semele (1894-95), by Gustave Moreau

Demeter, enthroned and extending her hand in a benediction toward the kneeling Metaneira, who offers the triune wheat that is a recurring symbol of the mysteries (Varrese Painter, red-figure hydria, c. 340 BC, from Apulia)

Demeter, enthroned and extending her hand in a benediction toward the kneeling Metaneira, who offers the triune wheat that is a recurring symbol of the mysteries (Varrese Painter, red-figure hydria, c. 340 BC, from Apulia)

Votive plaque depicting elements of the Eleusinian Mysteries, discovered in the sanctuary at Eleusis (mid-4th century BC)

Votive plaque depicting elements of the Eleusinian Mysteries, discovered in the sanctuary at Eleusis (mid-4th century BC)

Vittore Carpaccio,  Vision of St Augustin, 1502.

Vittore Carpaccio, Vision of St Augustin, 1502.

"Universal Man" illumination from Hildegard von Bingen’s Liber Divinorum Operum, I.2. Lucca, MS 1942, early 13th century.

"Universal Man" illumination from Hildegard von Bingen’s Liber Divinorum Operum, I.2. Lucca, MS 1942, early 13th century.

abystle:

Orpheus by Gustave Moreau in 1865

abystle:

Orpheus by Gustave Moreau in 1865

tagaoth:

Zodiac correspondences of the human body - Michael of Rhodes ~1434

tagaoth:

Zodiac correspondences of the human body - Michael of Rhodes ~1434

(via tagaoth-deactivated20130705)

lunaghoststar:

The Magical Calendar is one of the most amazing pieces of art and information available in Western Hermeticism.

Published in 1620, the Magical Calendar contains tables of correspondences arranged by number from one to twelve. They are based in part on extensive tables in Agrippa, book 2, chapters 4-14 but go well beyond anything in Agrippa, especially sigils. The engraving was executed by the brilliant Johannes Theodorus de Bry who illustrated other important occult works such as those of Robert Fludd. The author was Johann Baptista Großchedel. Carlos Gilly has identified the original manuscript on which the printed Magical Calendar was based as British Library manuscript Harley 3420.

Adam McLean published a wonderful study of it in The Magical Calendar: A Synthesis of Magical Symbolism from the Seventeenth-Century Renaissance of Medieval Occultism (available via amazon.com)

[more] [even more]

(Source: moonfall-requiem, via rclinkdump)

effervescentaardvark:

First panel from Bernard Notke’s “Dance of Death” (Danse macabre) from the remaining panels viewable at St Nicolas’ Church, Tallinn, Estonia.

His “Danse macabre” painting in St. Mary’s Church, Lubeck, was destroyed in the bombing of Lubeck in WWII.

The verson in St. Nicolas’s church is sadly incomplete, but is still 7.5 metres long (complete it would have been 30 metres long).

Danse macabre paintings were common in late medieval times, up to the 16th Century as plagues such as the Black Death spread across Europe. The pictures served to show that death would come for anyone regardless of their position in life. No one was safe, from the youngest and the poorest to the rich and important. In the paintings Death is depicted as a skeletal figure, leading people away from this life to the next.

in this first panel of the picture the preacher tells us the meaning behind the painting, while Death apparently serenades us with bagpipe music…

(via rclinkdump)

hauntedranch:

A Young Daughter of the Picts, c. 1585. Attributed to Jacques Le Moyne de Morgues. Watercolour and gouache touched with gold.

hauntedranch:

A Young Daughter of the Picts, c. 1585. Attributed to Jacques Le Moyne de Morgues. Watercolour and gouache touched with gold.

(Source: hauntedcola)

highvictoriana:

French gold and enamel scent bottle, mid 19th century.

highvictoriana:

French gold and enamel scent bottle, mid 19th century.

(via nonconspiracyorchestra)